In Memory of E. Roy John PhD – World Renowned Neuroscientist

Life offers us many teachers, and we generally only learn a small sliver of what they have to offer from the breadth and depth of their experience.

One such teacher was E. Roy John, who most knew as a brain researcher, though he had so much more to offer… did you know he was “blacklisted” as a liberal, or that he worked on the Manhattan Project making Plutonium? Did you know he is considered the grandfather of Cuban Neuroscience? How about his love of boating…

Perhaps a quick look through his obituary will make us all appreciate just a bit more the actual magnitude of our loss from his passing…. And then you can look over the diagram of the brain and see some of the complexity of the models Roy passed on to those who now have to carry on without his wise counsel.

Joyful in having known him, and saddened by our loss,

Jay

In Memory of E. Roy John PhD

Brain Functional Diagram from Roy John PhD

Congressional Briefing on TBI for Wounded Soldiers

The Brain Injury Task Force offered its recommendations  to Congress today from a conference last fall, sponsored by the congressional task force on brain injuries.

The group suggested that an assessment tool be used in wartime to determine if a soldier should return to duty. It also recommended improvements to traumatic brain injury research,  identified the barriers to treatment and strategized on the improvements for continuum of care and more resources for families of troops with TBI. The Congressional Briefing was highlighted on front page of MSNBC in an article titled  “Better Brain Trauma Testing Urged for Troops”.

Letter to APA regarding qEEG

This letter has been sent to the American Psychological Association because they have for so long seemly ignored a growing number of psychologists who provide neurofeedback and QEEGs to people who have many disorders , often, disorders that were”incurable”.

Our organization needs to provide information regarding the types of training/treatment that has been proven  over and over to help clients that have severe impediments to their lives.  If you feel similarly and would like to either sign this letter or write your own, it may cause some movement in APA and the Monitor to recognize the services we provide.

Merlyn Hurd PhD;BCIAC/EEG Fellow
Editor of NeuroConnections the ISNR/AAPB Neurofeedback division

Letter to APA regarding qEEG – March 09 2009

James H Bray PhD, President APA
Rhea K. Farberman, Executive Editor Monitor on Psychology
750 First Street, N.E.
Washington, DC 20002-4242

Dear Drs. Bray and Farberman,

Imagine the excitement of seeing “Brain Imaging” on the front of the Monitor for the March 2009 edition.  Finally, the APA is writing about QEEGs (quantitative electroencephalograms) and the types of work that is being done by thousands of psychologists in the neurofeedback world.

Read more…

Is neurofeedback an efficacious treatment for ADHD? A randomized controlled clinical trial

Background:

For children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a reduction of inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity by neurofeedback (NF) has been reported in several studies. But so far, unspecific training effects have not been adequately controlled for and/or studies do not provide sufficient statistical power. To overcome these methodological shortcomings we evaluated the clinical efficacy of neurofeedback in children with ADHD in a multisite randomised controlled study using a computerised attention skills training as a control condition.

Read more…

EEG based Personalized Medicine in ADHD

Neurophysiological studies in ADHD have shown a relatively uniform picture with regards to EEG – QEEG data (based on group data). Most studies find excess slow brain activity (theta) (Hermens et al., 2004; Mann et al., 1992; Chabot and Serfontein, 1996; Clarke et al., 1998, 2001; Lazzaro et al., 1998, 1999) and a decreased fast brain activity (beta) (Hermens et al., 2004; Clarke et al., 1998; Mann et al., 1992; Lazzaro et al., 1998, 1999). Theta EEG activity is often associated with an “inattentive” or a dreamy state, and beta activity is often seen when the brain is very busy with for instance solving a cognitive task. Figure 1 shows an example of this based on the data of the Brain Resource International Brain Database of 275 patients with ADHD. In this example the increased theta and decreased beta can be clearly seen, with a frontal localization.

group data
Theta                              Absolute Beta                     Relative Beta

Figure 1: This figure shows the average brain activity (quantitative EEG – QEEG) of 275 children with ADHD, compared to a control group. On the left the increased theta EEG activity (p<.0001) can be seen, in the middle the absolute beta EEG activity (p<.0001) and on the left the decreased relative beta EEG activity (p<.0001). This deviant brain activity has a fronto-central localization. This pattern is found in almost all ADHD studies.

Read more…

Traumatic Brain Injury Task Force Congressional Briefing

St Joseph’s Regional Medical Center on behalf of the participants of the International Conference on Behavioral Health and Traumatic Brain Injury invites you on March 12, 2009 at 11:00am to a Congressional Briefing.

The participants of the International Conference on Behavioral Health and Traumatic Brain Injury will be holding a Congressional Briefing hosted by:

Congressman Bill Pascrell and  Congressman Todd Platts

Co-Chairs, Congressional Brain Injury Task Force presenting recommendations to improve the care of our wounded warriors NOW!

In October of 2008, St Joseph’s Regional Medical Center hosted the International Conference on Behavioral Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. 100 doctors, researchers and scientists from around the globe discussed issues facing our wounded warriors, identified the barriers to treatment and strategized on the improvements for continuum of care. This briefing will present their reccomendations.

The meeting will be held @ the Capitol Visitors Center- Congressional Meeting Room South

RSVP – rsvp@susandavis.com